Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations

Facebook icon Twitter icon Instagram icon
Education Through School Sport
Find Your Championship Site

2015 OFSAA Coaching Symposium

Tuesday, October, 14, 2014

May 12 - 13 at Durham College

The 2015 OFSAA Coaching Symposium conference is a great professional development event that brings together teacher-coaches from across the province to learn, share ideas, and have fun! The program encompasses a wide variety of sessions for both curricular and co-curricular programs with sessions geared towards high school and elementary school teachers.

The Coaching Symposium focuses on the technical side of coaching, providing sport-specific skills, drills and strategies through both active and classroom sessions. The program offers sessions ranging from introductory to advanced that will benefit both new and seasoned coaches. All sessions offered will be instructed by highly qualified and experienced coaches and instructors. Best practice sessions will also be offered for new and experienced educators; providing strategies and information useful to any physical education environment. 

General Information

The 2015 OFSAA Coaching Symposium will run May 12th & 13th at Durham College in Oshawa. The organizing committee is in the process of securing presenters, so information will be added and updated as it becomes available. Please check back regularly for updates. In the meantime, general conference information has been provided for your convenience.

To download the general information flyer, click here.

  • Presenter information can be found here.
  • The draft schedule for this year's conference can be viewed here.
  • Session descriptions can be found here.
  • Tradeshow information can be found here.
  • For registration information, click here. 
  • Click here to register online now!

Attention Presenters!

OFSAA is looking for energetic educators to present at the 2015 Coaching Symposium. All presenters will receive an honourarium, registration discount or registration free of charge.

If you are interested in presenting, please visit our Presenter Information page for more information about sessions being offered, the conference schedule, and to complete the presenter application form.

If you have questions please contact:

Shamus Bourdon
Assistant Director
416-426-7436
shamus@ofsaa.on.ca

Hydration for Sports

Wednesday, October, 8, 2014

Though most of the warm weather is behind us now, student-athletes will still be heating up with Fall sports across Ontario.

In order to perform at your best, and stay healthy while participating, check out these tips from medical expert Kathleen Zelman.

Read the full column on webmd.com

"When it's warm, your body perspires more to help you cool down. And depending on the temperature, humidity, and the nature of your activity, you might not even realize how much you are perspiring.

Don't rely on thirst alone to tell you how much you need to drink. To keep those muscles working and avoid fatigue; it's extremely important to drink plenty of liquids before, during, and after the activity. 

Drink Up -- Before, During and After

A good guideline to use when preparing for an outdoor workout, whether it's walking, running, biking, or tennis, is to drink about two cups of fluid two hours before the activity. That helps make sure you are well-hydrated before you ever go outdoors.

Then, during the activity, try to drink 4-6 ounces every 15-20 minutes to keep your muscles well-hydrated. If you are planning an hour-long walk or gym workout, fill a water bottle with about 16 ounces (2 cups) and take it with you.

Last, drink up after you're finished with your exercise. If you really want to be precise, weigh yourself before you start exercising and again when you are finished. For each pound of water weight you lose, drink 20 ounces of fluid.

Which Liquids Are Best?

For most outdoor activities, good old-fashioned tap water does the trick. If your activity lasts an hour or more, either fruit juice diluted with water or a sports drink will provide carbohydrates for energy plus minerals to replace lost electrolytes (sodium, potassiummagnesium) in your sweat.

Sports drinks like Gatorade, Powerade, and All Sport can give you a needed energy boost during your activity. They are designed to rapidly replace fluids and to increase the sugar (glucose) circulating in your blood.

Read the label to determine which sports drink that is best for you. Ideally, it will provide around 14 grams of carbohydrates, 28 mg of potassium, and 100 mg of sodium per 8-ounce serving. The drink's carbohydrates should come from glucose, sucrose, and/or fructose -- all of which are easily and quickly absorbed. It shouldn't be carbonated, as the bubbles can lead to an upset stomach.

Most sports beverages are well-diluted and contain relatively few calories. If the flavor of a sports drink helps you drink up and maintain hydration, by all means enjoy. If you're worried about the added calories, try diluting your sports drink with water or pouring it into a thermos packed with ice.

What About Fitness and Designer Waters? 

Fitness waters fall somewhere between the sports drinks and plain water. They contain fewer calories and electrolytes than sports drinks, but offer more taste than plain water. The choice is yours: once again, if drinking these beverages helps you stay hydrated, go for it.

These "super-waters" are advertised as being enhanced with everything from vitamins, oxygen and glucose, to alleged fat-burning minerals. Keep in mind that the FDA does not require proof of this kind of claim. So think of these products as designer waters that serve the primary purpose of hydration and little more.

Beyond Hydration

Fluids are vital to help your muscles function throughout your activity -- but so is your blood sugar. You need to eat a light meal or snack of at least 100 calories about an hour or so before your activity. The nutrients from the snack will help you perform better and keep hunger from interfering with your activity.

The best snacks combine healthy carbohydrates, protein, and a small amount of fat. Fruit, yogurt, nuts, and granola bars are all good examples."

Back in the Game Webisodes

Friday, October, 3, 2014

This summer the Canadian Football League (CFL) and Nissan partnered to lend a helping hand to deserving high school football teams across Canada. 

Eight of the schools selected are from Ontario. Throughout their seasons, cameras will capture the ups and downs and reveal the characters of teacher-coaches and student-athletes.

Watch all games at backinthegame.ca

Episode 1 introduced viewers to Sir John A. Macdonald Secondary School in Hamilton and coach Jeff Cott (starting at 3:42),

 

Episode 3 follows up with the team from Sir John A. Macdonald as they get ready for their first game of the season,

High School Coaches Workshop from Athletics Ontario

Thursday, October, 2, 2014

Athletics Ontario has set up a High School Track and Field Coaching Workshop Nov. 7-8, 2014.

Download the PDF Information Flyer by clicking here.

The course will take place at York University's Toronto Track and Field Centre with learning facilitators from Athletics Canada, Athletics Ontario, OFSAA, and the Canadian Sport Institute Ontario (CSIO).

To register please follow this link or contact Sue Wise for more information.

Schedule

Friday, November 7th @ Toronto Track & Field Centre

5:45 pm—6:00 pm 
Registration 

6:00 pm—7:00 pm 
Technology in Coaching (CSIO) 
Nutrition for HS Athletes (CSIO) 

7:00 pm—8:00 pm 
Integration of Para Athletes into your program -Kayla Cornale 
LTAD—Sue Wise 

8:00 pm—9:00 pm 
Program planning for HS Coaches 
Tony Sharpe/Patrick Russell 

9:00 pm—11:00 pm 
Coaches Social 

 Saturday, November 8th @ Toronto Track & Field Centre

*coaches will select one event area from the following 

9:00 am—1:00 pm 
1) Jumps (Long Jump, Triple Jump, High Jump) 
2) Throws (Shot, Discus, Javelin, seated throws) 
3) Sprints (Sprint Starts, Hurdles, Relay) 
4) Other (Cross Country, Steeplechase Wheelchair racing) 

1:00 pm—2:00 pm 
Lunch (Provided) 

2:00 pm—3:30 pm 
1) Training for Jumps 
2) Training for Throwers 
3) Training for Sprints and Hurdles 

 

Cost 

Friday (only): $50 (includes social) 

Saturday (only): $75 (includes lunch) 

Friday and Saturday: $115 ($105 for AO Members) (includes social, and lunch) 

*max 15-20 per group 

Eating and Exercising

Friday, September, 26, 2014

All students should be eating a healthy breakfast every morning, but what about if you have a morning practice? Should you eat? What should you eat? And how about eating some snacks after school before your team meets on the court or the gym, or when you get home from school after a good team practice? Here's some advice from the Mayo Clinic.org

1. Eat a healthy breakfast

If you exercise in the morning, get up early enough to finish breakfast at least one hour before your workout. Most of the energy you got from dinner the previous night is used up by morning, and your blood sugar might be low. If you don't eat, you might feel sluggish or lightheaded when you exercise.

If you plan to exercise within an hour after breakfast, eat a light breakfast or drink something to raise your blood sugar, such as a sports drink. Emphasize carbohydrates for maximum energy.

Good breakfast options include:

  • Whole-grain cereals or bread
  • Low-fat milk
  • Juice
  • Bananas
  • Yogurt
  • A waffle or pancake

And remember, if you normally have coffee in the mornings, a cup before your workout is probably OK. Also know that anytime you try a food or drink for the first time before a workout, you risk an upset stomach.

2. Size matters

Be careful not to overdo it when it comes to how much you eat before exercise. The general guideline:

  • Large meals. Eat these at least three to four hours before exercising.
  • Small meals. Eat these two to three hours before exercising.
  • Small snacks. Eat these an hour before exercising.

Eating too much before you exercise can leave you feeling sluggish. Eating too little might not give you the energy to keep you feeling strong throughout your workout.

3. Snack well

Most people can eat small snacks right before and during exercise. The key is how you feel. Do what works best for you. Snacks eaten soon before exercise probably won't give you added energy, but they can help keep up your blood sugar and prevent distracting hunger pangs. Good snack options include:

  • Energy bars
  • Bananas or other fresh fruit
  • Yogurt
  • Fruit smoothies
  • Whole-grain bagel or crackers
  • Low-fat granola bars
  • Peanut butter sandwiches

A healthy snack is especially important if you plan a workout several hours after a meal.

4. Eat after you exercise

To help your muscles recover and to replace their glycogen stores, eat a meal that contains both protein and carbohydrates within two hours of your exercise session if possible. Good post-workout food choices include:

  • Yogurt and fruit
  • Peanut butter sandwich
  • Low-fat chocolate milk and pretzels
  • Pasta with meatballs
  • Chicken with brown rice

5. Drink up

Don't forget to drink fluids. You need adequate fluids before, during and after exercise to help prevent dehydration.

To stay well-hydrated for exercise, the American College of Sports Medicine recommends that you:

  • Drink roughly 2 to 3 cups (473 to 710 milliliters) of water during the two to three hours before your workout.
  • Drink about 1/2 to 1 cup (118 to 237 milliliters) of water every 15 to 20 minutes during your workout. Adjust amounts related to your body size and the weather.
  • Drink roughly 2 to 3 cups (473 to 710 milliliters) of water after your workout for every pound (0.5 kilogram) of weight you lose during the workout.

Water is generally the best way to replace lost fluids. But if you're exercising for more than 60 minutes, use a sports drink. Sports drinks can help maintain your body's electrolyte balance and give you a bit more energy because they contain carbohydrates.

Let experience be your guide

Keep in mind that the duration and intensity of your activity will dictate how often and what you should eat and drink. For example, you'll need more energy from food to run a marathon than to walk around the block.

When it comes to eating and exercise, everyone is different. So pay attention to how you feel during your workout and to your overall performance. Let your experience guide you on which pre- and post-exercise eating habits work best for you. Consider keeping a journal to monitor how your body reacts to meals and snacks so that you can tweak your diet for optimal performance.

Ontario Coaching Excellence Awards

Tuesday, September, 9, 2014

It's hard to recognize so many good coaches throughout the province in just one day, which is why the Coaches Association of Ontario gives them a whole week! Ontario Coaches Week takes place September 20-27, 2014.

The Ontario Coaching Excellence Awards kicked off OCW on Saturday, September 20th at the Scotiabank Theatre in Toronto. The Awards celebrate the dedication and commitment of exemplary people who inspire, innovate and share knowledge of sport with others.

Leslie Lawlor (Sydenham High School, Kingston) and Ken VanderZwaag (Woodland Christian High School, Kitchener) won in the School Sport category. OFSAA congratulates Leslie and Ken on their awards, and thanks them for their dedication to student-athletes through the years.

Leslie Lawlor


Ken VanderZwaag

 

Teacher-coaches in Ontario are encouraged to take advantage of the CAO will offering FREE NCCP multi-sport courses on each day of the week across the province. To see each of the FREE programs listing, location and registration information CLICK HERE

With sport-specific and multi-sport courses, there's something for everybody. Happy coaches week!

Globe story on physical literacy

Wednesday, September, 3, 2014

OFSAA's motto "Education Through School Sport" is all about the connection between physical literacy and success in the classroom. The skills learned on the field and the life lessons learned off of it through sport are an invaluable and inseparable part of secondary school education.

A study completed last year by Rob Williamson of the University of Ottawa concluded that student-athletes scored higher in specific developmental areas than those students who do not participate in athletics.

As schools reopen their doors to students for the 2014-15 school year, the Globe and Mail's Erin Anderssen wrote an article titled, "How physical exercise helps to get students intellectually fit," which has been exerpted below. Click here for the full story.

"To prep for high-school life, incoming Grade 9 students paid an early visit to Midland Secondary on Thursday. They found where their lockers will be, were given their timetables and memorized their wireless passwords.

They also received a short session on the importance of exercise. But intellectual – not physical – fitness was the theme. They learned that classes at this 100-year-old school in Georgian Bay’s cottage country don’t just mean sitting at desk. Here, studying everything from history to calculus also includes soccer in the hallway, ultimate Frisbee in the yard, even “swimming” across the floor – some of the brief workouts known as Spark breaks.

Classes last 75 minutes, but “I really find it hard to sit for 10 minutes, to be honest,” admits Walker Hunter, a Grade 10 student who was helping to demonstrate floor swimming and other activities at the orientation. During a fitness break, he says, “you get refreshed, but you’re still in work mode, and you can start up again. It gives me time to get out and refocus.”

Getting students to focus is a perennial preoccupation, but it seems especially pressing at the moment, with grade-obsessed parents, politicians and school trustees wringing their hands over Canada’s recent slide in international math standings.

With that worry back in the news this week when Ontario’s elementary math scores took a dip, neuroscience offers this subversive solution: Cut math class to dance – or walk, skip, play catch … the theory being that whatever gets the heart pumping will get the brain humming as well.

“If you want to raise test scores, we have documented evidence – big-time evidence – that that the key is to include fitness-based activity in the day,” insists John Ratey, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School and a lead researcher in the area. “There’s no question about it.”

Welcome back teacher-coaches and student-athletes!

Follow @OFSAAGRAM!

Monday, August, 18, 2014

OFSAA is now on Instagram! Follow us at @OFSAAGRAM

We will be following and interacting with proud student-athletes and teacher-coaches posting and hashtagging their accomplishments. So many photos with #OFSAA and #OFSAAbound tags end up with #OFSAAchamps or #OFSAAgold!

Share your experiences with us and we'll keep you posted on OFSAA news, throwbacks, and Championship/ Festival pics!

Pages

Subscribe to Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations RSS