Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations

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Back in the Game Webisodes

Friday, October, 3, 2014

This summer the Canadian Football League (CFL) and Nissan partnered to lend a helping hand to deserving high school football teams across Canada. 

Eight of the schools selected are from Ontario. Throughout their seasons, cameras will capture the ups and downs and reveal the characters of teacher-coaches and student-athletes.

Watch all games at backinthegame.ca

Episode 1 introduced viewers to Sir John A. Macdonald Secondary School in Hamilton and coach Jeff Cott (starting at 3:42),

 

Episode 3 follows up with the team from Sir John A. Macdonald as they get ready for their first game of the season,

High School Coaches Workshop from Athletics Ontario

Thursday, October, 2, 2014

Athletics Ontario has set up a High School Track and Field Coaching Workshop Nov. 7-8, 2014.

Download the PDF Information Flyer by clicking here.

The course will take place at York University's Toronto Track and Field Centre with learning facilitators from Athletics Canada, Athletics Ontario, OFSAA, and the Canadian Sport Institute Ontario (CSIO).

To register please follow this link or contact Sue Wise for more information.

Schedule

Friday, November 7th @ Toronto Track & Field Centre

5:45 pm—6:00 pm 
Registration 

6:00 pm—7:00 pm 
Technology in Coaching (CSIO) 
Nutrition for HS Athletes (CSIO) 

7:00 pm—8:00 pm 
Integration of Para Athletes into your program -Kayla Cornale 
LTAD—Sue Wise 

8:00 pm—9:00 pm 
Program planning for HS Coaches 
Tony Sharpe/Patrick Russell 

9:00 pm—11:00 pm 
Coaches Social 

 Saturday, November 8th @ Toronto Track & Field Centre

*coaches will select one event area from the following 

9:00 am—1:00 pm 
1) Jumps (Long Jump, Triple Jump, High Jump) 
2) Throws (Shot, Discus, Javelin, seated throws) 
3) Sprints (Sprint Starts, Hurdles, Relay) 
4) Other (Cross Country, Steeplechase Wheelchair racing) 

1:00 pm—2:00 pm 
Lunch (Provided) 

2:00 pm—3:30 pm 
1) Training for Jumps 
2) Training for Throwers 
3) Training for Sprints and Hurdles 

 

Cost 

Friday (only): $50 (includes social) 

Saturday (only): $75 (includes lunch) 

Friday and Saturday: $115 ($105 for AO Members) (includes social, and lunch) 

*max 15-20 per group 

Eating and Exercising

Friday, September, 26, 2014

All students should be eating a healthy breakfast every morning, but what about if you have a morning practice? Should you eat? What should you eat? And how about eating some snacks after school before your team meets on the court or the gym, or when you get home from school after a good team practice? Here's some advice from the Mayo Clinic.org

1. Eat a healthy breakfast

If you exercise in the morning, get up early enough to finish breakfast at least one hour before your workout. Most of the energy you got from dinner the previous night is used up by morning, and your blood sugar might be low. If you don't eat, you might feel sluggish or lightheaded when you exercise.

If you plan to exercise within an hour after breakfast, eat a light breakfast or drink something to raise your blood sugar, such as a sports drink. Emphasize carbohydrates for maximum energy.

Good breakfast options include:

  • Whole-grain cereals or bread
  • Low-fat milk
  • Juice
  • Bananas
  • Yogurt
  • A waffle or pancake

And remember, if you normally have coffee in the mornings, a cup before your workout is probably OK. Also know that anytime you try a food or drink for the first time before a workout, you risk an upset stomach.

2. Size matters

Be careful not to overdo it when it comes to how much you eat before exercise. The general guideline:

  • Large meals. Eat these at least three to four hours before exercising.
  • Small meals. Eat these two to three hours before exercising.
  • Small snacks. Eat these an hour before exercising.

Eating too much before you exercise can leave you feeling sluggish. Eating too little might not give you the energy to keep you feeling strong throughout your workout.

3. Snack well

Most people can eat small snacks right before and during exercise. The key is how you feel. Do what works best for you. Snacks eaten soon before exercise probably won't give you added energy, but they can help keep up your blood sugar and prevent distracting hunger pangs. Good snack options include:

  • Energy bars
  • Bananas or other fresh fruit
  • Yogurt
  • Fruit smoothies
  • Whole-grain bagel or crackers
  • Low-fat granola bars
  • Peanut butter sandwiches

A healthy snack is especially important if you plan a workout several hours after a meal.

4. Eat after you exercise

To help your muscles recover and to replace their glycogen stores, eat a meal that contains both protein and carbohydrates within two hours of your exercise session if possible. Good post-workout food choices include:

  • Yogurt and fruit
  • Peanut butter sandwich
  • Low-fat chocolate milk and pretzels
  • Pasta with meatballs
  • Chicken with brown rice

5. Drink up

Don't forget to drink fluids. You need adequate fluids before, during and after exercise to help prevent dehydration.

To stay well-hydrated for exercise, the American College of Sports Medicine recommends that you:

  • Drink roughly 2 to 3 cups (473 to 710 milliliters) of water during the two to three hours before your workout.
  • Drink about 1/2 to 1 cup (118 to 237 milliliters) of water every 15 to 20 minutes during your workout. Adjust amounts related to your body size and the weather.
  • Drink roughly 2 to 3 cups (473 to 710 milliliters) of water after your workout for every pound (0.5 kilogram) of weight you lose during the workout.

Water is generally the best way to replace lost fluids. But if you're exercising for more than 60 minutes, use a sports drink. Sports drinks can help maintain your body's electrolyte balance and give you a bit more energy because they contain carbohydrates.

Let experience be your guide

Keep in mind that the duration and intensity of your activity will dictate how often and what you should eat and drink. For example, you'll need more energy from food to run a marathon than to walk around the block.

When it comes to eating and exercise, everyone is different. So pay attention to how you feel during your workout and to your overall performance. Let your experience guide you on which pre- and post-exercise eating habits work best for you. Consider keeping a journal to monitor how your body reacts to meals and snacks so that you can tweak your diet for optimal performance.

Ontario Coaching Excellence Awards

Tuesday, September, 9, 2014

It's hard to recognize so many good coaches throughout the province in just one day, which is why the Coaches Association of Ontario gives them a whole week! Ontario Coaches Week takes place September 20-27, 2014.

The Ontario Coaching Excellence Awards kicked off OCW on Saturday, September 20th at the Scotiabank Theatre in Toronto. The Awards celebrate the dedication and commitment of exemplary people who inspire, innovate and share knowledge of sport with others.

Leslie Lawlor (Sydenham High School, Kingston) and Ken VanderZwaag (Woodland Christian High School, Kitchener) won in the School Sport category. OFSAA congratulates Leslie and Ken on their awards, and thanks them for their dedication to student-athletes through the years.

Leslie Lawlor


Ken VanderZwaag

 

Teacher-coaches in Ontario are encouraged to take advantage of the CAO will offering FREE NCCP multi-sport courses on each day of the week across the province. To see each of the FREE programs listing, location and registration information CLICK HERE

With sport-specific and multi-sport courses, there's something for everybody. Happy coaches week!

Globe story on physical literacy

Wednesday, September, 3, 2014

OFSAA's motto "Education Through School Sport" is all about the connection between physical literacy and success in the classroom. The skills learned on the field and the life lessons learned off of it through sport are an invaluable and inseparable part of secondary school education.

A study completed last year by Rob Williamson of the University of Ottawa concluded that student-athletes scored higher in specific developmental areas than those students who do not participate in athletics.

As schools reopen their doors to students for the 2014-15 school year, the Globe and Mail's Erin Anderssen wrote an article titled, "How physical exercise helps to get students intellectually fit," which has been exerpted below. Click here for the full story.

"To prep for high-school life, incoming Grade 9 students paid an early visit to Midland Secondary on Thursday. They found where their lockers will be, were given their timetables and memorized their wireless passwords.

They also received a short session on the importance of exercise. But intellectual – not physical – fitness was the theme. They learned that classes at this 100-year-old school in Georgian Bay’s cottage country don’t just mean sitting at desk. Here, studying everything from history to calculus also includes soccer in the hallway, ultimate Frisbee in the yard, even “swimming” across the floor – some of the brief workouts known as Spark breaks.

Classes last 75 minutes, but “I really find it hard to sit for 10 minutes, to be honest,” admits Walker Hunter, a Grade 10 student who was helping to demonstrate floor swimming and other activities at the orientation. During a fitness break, he says, “you get refreshed, but you’re still in work mode, and you can start up again. It gives me time to get out and refocus.”

Getting students to focus is a perennial preoccupation, but it seems especially pressing at the moment, with grade-obsessed parents, politicians and school trustees wringing their hands over Canada’s recent slide in international math standings.

With that worry back in the news this week when Ontario’s elementary math scores took a dip, neuroscience offers this subversive solution: Cut math class to dance – or walk, skip, play catch … the theory being that whatever gets the heart pumping will get the brain humming as well.

“If you want to raise test scores, we have documented evidence – big-time evidence – that that the key is to include fitness-based activity in the day,” insists John Ratey, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School and a lead researcher in the area. “There’s no question about it.”

Welcome back teacher-coaches and student-athletes!

Follow @OFSAAGRAM!

Monday, August, 18, 2014

OFSAA is now on Instagram! Follow us at @OFSAAGRAM

We will be following and interacting with proud student-athletes and teacher-coaches posting and hashtagging their accomplishments. So many photos with #OFSAA and #OFSAAbound tags end up with #OFSAAchamps or #OFSAAgold!

Share your experiences with us and we'll keep you posted on OFSAA news, throwbacks, and Championship/ Festival pics!

Coaches Teaching New Coaches

Monday, August, 18, 2014

The Coaches Association of Ontario has developed a program based on Fundamental Movement Skills for teacher-coaches to pass along their knowledge to a new generation of coaches-in-training.

With the Fundamental Movement Skills - High School Kit Program, certified PHE teachers can transfer knowledge of FMS to high school students, many of whom are summer camp leaders, community centre recreation workers, and after school programs leaders, who then can pass along these essential skills to future student-athletes.

In Ontario to date 150+ schools have joined the program and over 1500 students have been trained in teaching Fundamental Movement Skills. As a result 1000s of children have received better instruction, gained improved physical literacy, and hopefully, greater athletic confidence. 

                                                                               

The program is affordable, sustainable, designed to fit into existing high school course structure, and provides students with a nationally recognized NCCP credit. Coaches are encouraged to use these lessons to develop future teacher-coaches and transfer these skills to the next generation of student-athletes.

For more information visit the Coaches Association of Ontario website, or click the links above for more on FMS and the Kit Program.

Brian Maxwell Memorial Scholarship

Tuesday, August, 12, 2014

OFSAA and the Brian Maxwell Memorial Scholarship Fund are pleased to announce the student-athletes awarded the 2014 scholarships and Ontario Awards for Excellence.

(download full Media Release)

The scholarship fund is in memory of Brian Maxwell, a successful distance runner and entrepreneur, and co-founder of PowerBar, who later suffered a heart attack that claimed his life. Brian competed in Track & Field and Cross Country and achieved success as an OFSAA champion, Canadian junior, juvenile and senior champion, numerous international marathons, and as a member of the 1980 Canadian Olympic Marathon team.

The Brian Maxwell Memorial Scholarship is awarded each year to two student athletes that will be continuing their post secondary education at a Canadian College or University, and display qualities of honesty, integrity, compassion and an unwavering quest to accomplish the best he could academically and athletically while supporting his fellow team members.

One male and one female are awarded separate scholarships in the amounts of $5,000 each. The 2014 recipients are Mark Schmidt of Stratford, and Maggie Scheunert of Ottawa.

Mark Schmidt recently graduated from Stratford Northwestern Secondary School with a 90% average. As a distance runner, Mark finished 20th in OFSAA cross country in grade 12 and 10th in grade 10 as the three-time MVP of both his track and cross country team. Mark is also an award-winning youth hockey coach and has fundraised for Alzheimer Society, Muscular Dystrophy, and St. Martin of Tours Church. Mark will be studying engineering at Queen’s University this fall.

Maggie Scheunert is a graduate of Ecole secondaire catholique Garneau and finished with an average of 85%. She competed in OFSAA cross country grades 10,11, and 12, and won gold in 1500 steeple chase at 2014 OFSAA Track & Field. She helped coach school teams, set up Nordic skiing and volleyball teams, finished third in an Ottawa business competition, first in the Waterloo mathematics competition, and participated in a humanitarian trip to Jamaica. Maggie will also be studying engineering at Queen’s University and plans to pursue a career in research and development of prosthetics. 

The Brian Maxwell Memorial Scholarship Fund also organizes the Ontario Award for Excellence that presents a $1000 scholarship to student-athletes continuing to Canadian University or College. This year, the Fund elected to recognize a record four student-athletes with this award. The 2014 recipients are Paige NockCailie McGuireBrandon Thomas, and Nicholas Vukelic.

Paige Nock recently graduated from Courtice Secondary School (Courtice) with a 90% average, overcoming a learning disability and reading disorder. Paige qualified for OFSAA cross country every year, and this year at Track & Field placed fourth at 800m and fifth at 1500m, and will compete in the World Junior Championships at the 800m. Paige organized cross country events in elementary schools and will be studying psychology at Simon Fraser University to pursue a career helping children with learning disabilities.

Cailie McGuire graduated from Loyola Catholic Secondary School (Mississauga) with a 91% average. In the field Cailie qualified for OFSAA cross country every year since grade nine and achieved success on the track culminating with OFSAA silver in steeple chase this year. She was instrumental organizing intramurals and fitness clubs at school, and organized workshops to teach skating to new Canadians. Cailie will study physical education at the University of New Brunswick.

Brandon Thomas wrapped up his high school career at Paris District High School (Paris) with a 92% average, and finished in the top-15 at OFSAA Cross Country every year including bronze in grade 10. Brandon prepared a video called “The Myth of Lactic Acid”, coordinated fundraising events for the Canadian Cancer Society, and tutored and coordinated programs for the younger grades. Brandon will study science at Queen’s University with plans to pursue a career in medicine.

Nicholas Vukelic graduated from St. Aloysius Gonzaga Secondary School (Mississauga) with a 97% average. Nicholas qualified for OFSAA cross country his final two years of high school and placed tenth in steeple chase this year. He was valedictorian of his class, traveled to Dominican Republic on an outreach mission, served as head prefect of his school’s leadership organization and won the Edward King Memorial Award for leadership and academics. Nicholas will study a combined engineering and business degree at the University of Western Ontario Richard Ivey School of Business.

“I am very proud and impressed by each and every one of the Brian Maxwell Scholarship recipients,” said Jennifer Maxwell, wife of Brian and co-founder of PowerBar Corporation. “I’m so glad that running and academics have been such an important part of all your lives. I wish you much continued success as you go on to college and beyond.”

Congratulations to all scholarship recipients and we wish you the best of luck in continuing your educations and athletic careers at the post-secondary level!

CLICK HERE for more information on the award, past recipients, and how to apply

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