Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations

Facebook icon Twitter icon Instagram icon
Education Through School Sport
Find Your Championship Site

OFSAA Wrestling Results 2016

Thursday, March, 3, 2016
Visit the OFSAA Wrestling website

TEAM RESULTS

Overall Team

Gold - Turner Fenton (ROPSSAA)

Silver - Pickering (LOSSA)

Bronze - Bishop Ryan (GHAC)

Boys' Team

Gold - Turner Fenton

Silver - Bishop Ryan

Bronze - Saunders

Girls' Team

Gold - Turner Fenton

Silver - Pickering

Bronze - L'Essor

Girls' Individual Results

41KG

Gold - Virginie Gascon, L'Essor

Silver - Janet Tang, Turner Fenton

Bronze - Isreal Rain Roberts, Lourdes

44KG

Gold - Rylie George, Centre Wellington

Silver - Olivia Menard, L'Essor

Bronze - Sarah Coburn, Denis Morris

47.5KG

Gold - Rachael Swinson, Beamsville

Silver - Jaylin Reyes, Laura Secord

Bronze - Samantha Romano, Pickering

51KG

Gold - Daina Armstrong, Turner Fenton

Silver - Madison Clayton, Hammarskjold HS

Bronze - Sadie Hickson, Lindsay CVI

54KG

Gold - Amy Bellavia, Bishop Tonnes

Silver - Hannah Little, Centre Dufferin

Bronze - Taysia Pharr, Sandwich SS

57.5KG

Gold - Jayd Davis, Pickering

Silver - Jordan Schroecker, Cameron Heights

Bronze - Jess Hodgkin, Sandwich SS

61KG 

Gold - Wendy Liu, Albert Campbell

Silver - Sarah Long, Massey

Bronze - Shyanne Swartzman, North Hastings

64KG

Gold - Meredith Woodhouse, St. Joseph's

Silver - Tara Godfrey, Georgetown

Bronze - Sandra Bay, St. Jean de Brebeuf

67.5KG

Gold - Maddie Haney, Bear Creek

Silver - Annie Schiller, L'Essor

Bronze - Klara Patel, Merivale HS

72KG

Gold - Shantay Slater, Pickering

Silver - Rebekah Trudel, Superior Heights

Bronze - Sydney Lewis, St. Ignatius High School

77KG

Gold - Dejah Slater, Pickering

Silver - Taryn McLachlan, Trenton

Bronze - Taryn Robinson, Sarnia Collegiate

83KG

Gold - Kara Nixon, Centre Wellington

Silver - Jasmine Tessier, Macdonald

Bronze - Rachel Bannerman, Sir Winston Churchill

115KG

Gold - Tatyanna Foster, Turner Fenton

Silver - Dayjanea Johnson, Sandwich SS

Bronze - Kyra Williams, Ascension of Our Lord

 

Boys' Individual Results

38KG

Gold - Jeremiah Swarath, Saunders

Silver - Shazain Naqvi, Turner Fenton

Bronze - Matt Hadaway, Kitchener Collegiate

41KG

Gold - Jowel Swarath, Saunders

Silver - Owen Rivard, Monsignor Doyle

Bronze - Adam Vanderslagt, St. Clair

44KG

Gold - Lachlan McNeil, Newtonbrook

Silver - Nathan McMillan, St. Francis Xavier

Bronze - Prem Seecharran, Heart Lake

47.5KG

Gold - Patrik Leder, St. Francis Xavier

Silver - Mahdi Warsame, Eastwood

Bronze - Hussein Dasilva, Cathedral

51KG

Gold - Brayden Todd, Ingersoll

Silver - Matty Anderson, Sinclair

Bronze - Ethan Carelse-Turner, Turner Fenton

54KG

Gold - Marco Palermo, St. Patrick HS

Silver - Yogi Chakalall, Turner Fenton

Bronze - Hassan Al-Hayaui, Massey

57.5KG

Gold - Trystan Kato, Bill Crothers

Silver - Josh Piette-Walton, St. Joan of Arc

Bronze - Connor Quinton, Holy Cross

61KG

Gold - Kyle Robinson, Georgetown

Silver - Garrett Sales, Delhi

Bronze - William Young, Turner Fenton

64KG

Gold - Gunnar Sales, Delhi

Silver - Pierre Arubadijan, JF Ross

Bronze - Martin Wleh, Bishop Ryan

67.5KG

Gold - Harvir Lall, St. Benedict's

Silver - Raheem Rahamatulla, Sandalwood

Bronze - Adam Scott, Pickering

72KG

Gold - Simon Chaves, Guelph Collegiate

Silver - Alexander Geske, Bishop Ryan

Bronze - Abraham Ntijem, Cairine Wilson

77KG

Gold - Benny Zahra, Regiopolis Notre Dame

Silver - Jake Michaelis, Craig Kielburger

Bronze - Ty Bridgewater, Jacob Hespeler

83KG

Gold - Kyle Price, Theriault

Silver - Sarabnoor Lally, Louise Arbour

Bronze - Kyle Jordan, Neil McNeil

89KG

Gold - Tejvir Boal, West Humber

Silver - Daniel Francis, Saint Michael

Bronze - Austin Pilato, Denis Morris

95KG

Gold - Giordan Caruso, Bishop Ryan

Silver - Arjun Sahota, Ascension of Our Lord

Bronze - Ethan Slater, St. Ignatius HS

130KG

Gold - Lucas Rosa, Monsignor Doyle

Silver - Steven Collura, Bishop Ryan

Bronze - Curtis Cournyea, Centennial

Nordic, Alpine, Snowboarding Results 2016

Wednesday, March, 2, 2016
*FULL RESULTS AVAILABLE ON CHAMPIONSHIP WEBSITES*

OFSAA Nordic Skiing Championship

February 25-26, 2016

Highlands Nordic, Duntroon

Team Results

Senior Combined

Gold - Glebe CI (B)

Silver - Orangeville DSS

Bronze - Huntsville HS

- Parry Sound HS

Junior Combined

Gold - Glebe CI

Silver - Nepean HS

Bronze - Collingwood CI

Senior Boys

Gold - Glebe CI

Silver - West Hill SS

Bronze - Glebe CI (B)

Senior Girls

Gold - Glebe CI

Silver - Glebe CI (B)

Bronze - Beaver Brae SS

Junior Boys

Gold - Glebe CI

Silver - Parry Sound HS

Bronze - West Hill SS

Junior Girls

Gold - Collingwood CI

Silver - Parry Sound HS

Bronze - Nepean HS

 

Individual Results

Senior Boys

Gold - Aiden Kirkham, Earl of March SS

Silver - Alexander Maycock, Orangeville DSS

Bronze - Graham Ritchie, Parry Sound HS

Senior Girls

Gold - Alison Pouw, Glebe CI

Silver - Heidi Ohrling, Collingwood CI

Bronze - Alia Sanger, Lisgar CI

Junior Boys

Gold - Erik Ohrling, Collingwood CI

Silver - Spencer Vreugdenhil-Beaucler, West Hill SS

Bronze - Ben Milley, Glebe CI

Junior Girls

Gold - Shilo Rousseau, Central Algoma

Silver - Shaylynn Loewen, Parry Sound HS

Bronze - Natasia Varieur, Huntsville HS

PARA Standing Boys

Gold - Rory McDonald, Mayfield

PARA Standing Girls

Gold - Audréanne Soenens, ÉS Macdonald-Cartier

PARA Sit Ski Boys

Gold - Caelan Flannigan, Timiskaming District

 

Team Sprint Relay Results

Senior Boys

Gold - West Hill SS

Silver - Glebe CI (B)

Bronze - Orangeville DSS

Senior Girls

Gold - Glebe CI

Silver - Glebe CI (B)

Bronze - Beaver Brae SS

Junior Boys

Gold - Glebe CI

Silver - Nepean HS

Bronze - St. Peter SS

Junior Girls

Gold - Collingwood CI

Silver - Glebe CI

Bronze - Nepean HS


OFSAA Alpine Skiing Championship

February 29 - March 1, 2016

Blue Mountain, Collingwood

Level I Girls

Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Alegra Richter (ELM) Lasalle SS
Silver Kat Wang (BLHS) North Secondary School
Bronze Maggie Whitmore (KCVI) Bell High School

Giant Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Maggie Whitmore (KCVI) Aurora High
Silver Jennifer Steenhorst (AUR) Lawrence Park CI
Bronze Kara Passi (LSS) Lakefield College School
Level I Boys

Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Connor Roth (AUR) St. Michael's College
Silver Matt Orr (JVCHS) St. Andrews College
Bronze AJ McLean-Howard (SMCS) South Carleton HS

Giant Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Lachlan Carmichael (LPCI) Jean Vanier
Silver Matt Orr (JVCHS) St. Michael's College
Bronze Tom Cooney (HHSS) Lawrence Park CI

 

Level II Girls

Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Fred Pomerleau (TCS) Collingwood
Silver Anna Carruthers (CCS) Lawrence Park CI
Bronze Kasha Mansour (LPCI) Leaside HS

Giant Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Fred Pomerleau (TCS) Collingwood
Silver Mackenzie Bier (LHS) Lawrence Park CI
Bronze Jayden Metcalfe (CCS) Oakville Trafalgar HS
Level II Boys

Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Jacob Charendoff (CHA) Louis Riel
Silver Jonathon Neron (LRSS) St. Andrews College
Bronze Connor Hicks (TABL) Collingwood

Giant Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Carson Foxcroft (HSC) Louis Riel
Silver Parker Lobban (BCI) North Toronto CI
Bronze Jacob Charendoff (CHA) St. Andrews College

 

 

OFSAA Snowboarding Festival

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Beaver Valley (YRAA)

Level I Girls' Giant Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Sommer Gendron, Malvern CI Aurora 
Silver Georga Byrne, Aurora Country Day School
Bronze Quinn Bucciol, Aurora Lawrence Park CI

Level II Girls' Giant Slalom (Individual)

Gold - Holly Hamilton, Hillfield Strathallan

Silver - Jordan Tallis, Malvern CI

Bronze - Sadie Phillipson, Etobicoke School of the Arts

 

Level I Boys' Giant Slalom

  Individual Result Team Result
Gold Ryan Dewey, Perth DCI Renfrew Collegiate
Silver Caleb Coulas, Renfrew CI Aurora
Bronze Quinton Ladd, Perth DCI Country Day School

Level II Girls' Giant Slalom (Individual)

Gold - Corey Farber, CHAT (Richmond Hill)

Silver - Matthew Crawford, Northern SS

Bronze - Cam Oliver, Oakville Trafalgar

Nominate a Character Athlete in your School

Tuesday, February, 23, 2016

Once a year, OFSAA awards the Character Athlete Award to two recipients (one male, one female) who embody OFSAA’s values of leadership, commitment, equity, respect and sportsmanship. We've had some outstanding student-athletes apply in the past and are always blown away by the calibre of the young people we see.

The Character Athletes will be profiled in our Bulletin magazine, on our website, and in an official media release. They will also receive a $1000 scholarship from Josten's, and a plaque from OFSAA commemorating this accomplishment.

OFSAA Character Athlete nominations are due Monday, May 2

To nominate one of your student-athletes for the Character Athlete Award, please fill out the application form and submit it online.

Direct any questions to;

Devin Gray, OFSAA Communications Coordinator
devin@ofsaa.on.ca
Fax: 416-426-7317

Please include as much information as possible about your student-athlete.  Specifically their school and community involvement, and how they exemplify OFSAA’s values.

Past Recipients

 

Returning From A Concussion: How Soon Is Too Soon?

Wednesday, February, 17, 2016

story by Liana Brown from Education Forum magazine

"According to a report in the Toronto Star, young Canadian tennis player Eugenie Bouchard was walking over a freshly mopped floor in a dark training room late after a press conference when she slipped backward, smacking her elbow and head on the tiled floor. The next day she was forced to withdraw from the US Open, her most successful outing in over a year, after being diagnosed with a concussion. Eugenie is one of an estimated 39,000 (110 in 100,000) Canadians who will report suffering a concussion this year, although the actual number is probably higher because concussions tend to be underreported. American studies show that youth (under 20 years) most often sustain a concussion while participating in some sport or recreational activity (30–50 per cent). Activities like football, ice hockey, soccer, bicycling, rugby, basketball, baseball and even playground activities have reportable incidence rates. In high school athletes, the not-so-surprising pattern is that participants in full-contact sports (football, rugby, hockey, lacrosse) have higher rates of concussion than sports in which player-to-player contact is not the focus but frequently occurs (e.g., basketball, soccer, etc.), and that low-contact sports (volleyball, baseball, tennis, etc.) have the lowest rate of concussion. Motor vehicle accidents and falls are the next-most common mechanisms of injury in youth.

Concussion is a form of traumatic brain injury that results from the brain being shaken forcefully. A concussion can come either directly from a blow to the head, or indirectly from a force applied to the body that causes the head to rotate forcefully (e.g. whiplash). These forces cause the brain to quickly compress against one side of the skull and then rebound to the opposite side, leading to potential bruising to the surface of the brain and to the underlying neural tracts connecting different parts of the brain to each other. This initial injury can ignite a series of complex physiological events in which there is a release of the neurotransmitters that permit communication between neurons, a restriction of blood flow, and an increased demand for energy in the form of glucose and oxygen. Altogether, this unusual state forms the physical and functional injury that is associated with the signs and symptoms of concussion.

The majority of concussions(1) are classified as mild injuries because they lead to little or no loss of consciousness. Concussion can be tricky to detect. To start, not everyone who hits the turf hard will suffer the symptoms of concussion. There is no biomarker (blood test or brain imaging technique) that can reliably detect the presence of a concussion, and so assessment continues to depend on symptom reports. The signs and symptoms of concussion may appear immediately or over the first 24 hours. The typical symptoms include any one or more of headache, dizziness, nausea, disorientation and/or confusion, difficulty with balance, fatigue, sensitivity to lights and sounds, difficulty focusing, difficulty with memory, and loss of emotional composure. The presence of any one of these symptoms after a traumatic incident involving the head is sufficient to insist that the child or adolescent break from their current activity, and if the symptoms fail to quickly abate or worsen, or if symptoms appear later in the 24-hour window, then immediate medical attention should be sought. These symptoms are typically documented using one of several standardized checklists and mental status exams. Assessment may include brain imaging (a CT or MRI scan) to rule out complications like skull fracture or brain bleeding (hematoma).

For most people diagnosed with concussion, symptoms typically resolve without treatment in 7–10 days, but in 10–30 per cent of cases (reports vary), more recovery time is needed. This prolonged period of recovery is most-often characterized by persistent fatigue, headache, sensory sensitivity, and difficulty focussing, and is referred to as persistent post-concussion syndrome (PPCS). It is very difficult to predict who will experience PPCS. One University of Pittsburgh study of high school football players found that players who reported on-field dizziness at the time of injury were six times more likely to experience a prolonged recovery (>21 days). Otherwise there appears to be no relationship between the nature of symptoms initially experienced and the duration of PPCS. Youth who fall into this category will likely be assessed with a full neurological and neuropsychological exam and, as outlined below, may benefit from a progressive rehabilitation program."

To continue and read the full article please CLICK HERE


Women's Sport School Special Offer

Tuesday, February, 16, 2016

February 16 to March 16, 2016 is "Refer-a-Friend" special month for the 2016 OFSAA Women’s Sport School conference!

  • If you refer a friend who registers for the 2016 Women's Sport School, you will receive a 10% discount off of your registration!
  • If you have been referred by a friend, they will receive a 10% discount off of their registration.

 

**Please note that both parties must have fully registered (registration and payment) within the time allotted for the special.**

 

The 2016 OFSAA Women’s Sport School will be held May 12 & 13, 2016 at Durham College in Oshawa. The 2016 Women’s Sport School will include many exciting sessions on a variety of topics related to physical education including, Mentoring programs, Battling ropes, How to engage your students, KIN Ball, Yoga and Mindfulness, Coaching in Ontario Schools Certification and much more!

 

THIS IS A GREAT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND NETWORKING OPPORTUNITY FOR NEW AND EXPERIENCED FEMALE PHYSICAL EDUCATORS!!

 

For more information & to register visit: http://www.ofsaa.on.ca/events/conferences/womens-sport-school

 

Please contact Lexy Fogel with any questions at lex@ofsaa.on.ca or at 416-426-7436.

Scoreboard Man/ NEVCO announced as official shot clock of OFSAA

Tuesday, February, 9, 2016

When OFSAA’s representative council elected to transition high school basketball in Ontario to the International (FIBA) system at our AGM in 2015, the most significant change was the incorporation of the 35-second shot clock.

Through intensive research on the feasibility of installation, maintenance, mass availability, and electrical safety, OFSAA was careful with the selection of NEVCO and Scoreboard Man as our official clock.

NEVCO is the oldest and largest privately held scoreboard and display manufacturer in the industry.  Based in Barrie, they installed their first scoreboard in 1934. Paul Leskew and his team at the Scoreboard Man have been in business since 1971, are based in Orillia, and are the NEVCO representatives for Ontario.

Shot clocks will be lent to OFSAA for our Girls’ and Boys’ tournaments (A, AA, AAA) and schools hoping to simulate OFSAA conditions during league play can elect to purchase shot clocks of their own.

OFSAA, NEVCO, and Scoreboard Man have teamed up to provide safe and reliable options for purchase and installation of shot clocks.  We are happy to have partners that believe in the vision of OFSAA and support athletic programming in our high schools.  

For further information please download this PowerPoint prepared by Paul Leskew at Scoreboard Man

Please also download and refer to this document for What To Consider When You're Considering Shot Clocks, and make use of this Checklist and you'll be shot clock ready in no time!

 

OUA Raise Athletic Scholarships

Wednesday, January, 20, 2016

Athletic scholarships offered by the Ontario Universities, also known as Athletic Financial Awards (AFAs), are available for entering student-athletes with an average of at least 80%.

The maximum amount a university is allowed to give a student-athlete has been increased from $4000 to $4500 annually, but the actual amount is up to the discretion of the individual university.

Non-entering student-athletes can receive AFAs up to $4,500 annually provided they attained 70% on all registered course work. Full information from the OUA on athletic scholarships can be found by clicking the linked image below.


In addition to athletic scholarships there are many academic scholarships that student-athletes should be aware of. See OFSAA's list of Scholarships and Awards.

Team Spirit

Tuesday, January, 12, 2016
Adolescents who play team sports are less likely to experience mental illness later in life, study finds

Article from uToronto magazine by Brent Ledger

Regular participation in school sports during adolescence can improve mental health even years later, according to a new study from Prof. Catherine Sabiston of Kinesiology and Physical Education. Exercise has long been known to improve mood and mental clarity. Some research has indicated it could be as effective as medication for certain kinds of depression. But the new study is the first to suggest that the psychological benefits of school sports might be permanent and long-term.

Using data from a large, long-term study of Montreal high school students, Sabiston and colleagues noted students’ participation in such common school sports as basketball, soccer, and track and field (not, however, during phys-ed class or outside of school). Three years later, they assessed the students for symptoms of depression, perceived stress and self-reported mental health. On these measures, students who consistently participated in school sports were significantly better off than those who did not. And the protective effect persisted, even if the students didn’t continue to be active or play sports. “It’s not about the current levels of physical activity,” says Sabiston. “It comes back to what they got from that experience during adolescence. This is what is really impactful for mental health.”

Mental health problems often originate in adolescence and continue into adulthood so it’s important to identify strategies to slow or block their development, says Sabiston.

In a related study of team versus individual sports, Sabiston and colleagues found that only team participation provided protection against depressive symptoms. The reasons for this aren’t clear, although Sabiston suggests that team sports provide feelings of connection, moral development and a bond with an adult who is not your parent. All of which “we are seeing emerge in the literature as protective factors for mental health problems.”


Pages

Subscribe to Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations RSS